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Drew Black listen

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Drew* is a lawyer who received his JD from Dalhousie in 2020. He summered and articled at Lenczner Slaght, gaining experience on a wide range of matters including commercial litigation, construction, and professional liability. When you find yourself in a bind, Drew can take§ complicated legal issues and make them accessible. His ability to provide clear and easily understandable advice was honed during his time spent working at the Dalhousie Legal Aid Clinic, and at Lenczner Slaght. Drew brings the heat in any situation, whether he is in court defending his clients, on the rugby field playing for Dalhousie, or in the kitchen cooking for friends and family. .

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Drew Black (he/him)

is a lawyer at Lenczner Slaght.

Drew summered and articled at Lenczner Slaght where he worked on a variety of matters including complex commercial litigation, construction, and professional liability cases.

Drew completed his JD at the Dalhousie Schulich School of Law in Spring of 2020. While at law school, Drew worked full time at the Legal Aid Clinic in the Fall of 2019 as part of the Dalhousie clinical law program and represented clients in court on a variety of matters. He was also the recipient of multiple academic awards at Dalhousie, including first year torts and contracts.

Drew holds a Bachelor of Arts jointly from the University of King’s College and Dalhousie University. Drew balanced his academic interests with other pursuits including playing on the King’s and Dalhousie rugby teams. Drew was the recipient of the most valuable player award and was also named an Atlantic region all-star.

  • A Cautionary Tale: Admissions Against Interest in Regulatory and Subsequent Criminal Proceedings

    A recent decision from the Ontario Court of Appeal serves as a cautionary tale for regulated professionals and their counsel considering the terms of a potential resolution of discipline proceedings where related criminal proceedings may still be on the horizon. In R v Lo, the Court of Appeal upheld a trial judge’s decision during a criminal jury trial to admit into evidence the Agreed Statement of Fact (“ASF”) from a prior disciplinary hearing on related allegations before the College of Psychologists (“CPO”).

    Andrew Porter & Drew Black | October 13, 2020

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